Successful Parent-Coach Entrepreneur Mindset Traits (1-2-3)

 

Getting Into The Right Mindset

 

1. Practice Careful Optimism

Having a positive mind and positive outlook are crucial to being successful in business. Optimism is th mindset of those who are able to maintain less stress and more happiness.Confidence drives entrepreneurs to move forward. But there is danger in sheer and pure optimism. Excessive optimism can make one overlook risks and potential pitfalls. By all means, avoid pitfalls. While approaching business with an optimistic mindset, you also have to acknowledge that there are risks that you must exercise carefulness.

2. Optimizing Your Focus

If doing a particular task takes you four times as long as somebody else, it might be a simple lack of concentration. Find a mindset or affirmation you like, and repeat it mentally. That is one way to focus your mindset. If sales goals, for example, motivate you, then put pictures of what you will purchase with the money around your office. That is visual stimulation for your optimal mindset.

Are you an achiever and motivated by accomplishing tasks, than use a pie chart to illustrate the work that needs to be done. Then, at set intervals erase pieces of the pie until it is empty. It might just be a matter of distractions. Don’t play music while you work. Turn the ringer off the phones. Don’t sit in front a window if you are distracted easily. Working smarter, not harder, is aboutpeak performance and peak focus. When you are working at your peak, you get more done in less time. Leaving you time to do more of what you love.

3. Practice Healthy Pessimism

People will tell you that negative thinking will get you no where. Yes, depression does breed fear, which can stop you from taking the necessary steps to be successful. But there is use in having a little bit of healthy pessimism. Having healthy pessimism means that you are astute enough to recognize the pitfalls and risks involved in your venture. However, you are not pessimistic enough so as to allow those insights to stop you. Instead, you are driven to come up with solutions to every risk and difficulty that you encounter.That is a winning mindset!

Top-5-Secrets-for-Building-an-Entrepreneur’s Empire

Entrepreneurial Success:

Top 5 Secrets for Building an Empire

 

 Entrepreneurship is the way of the future! It may be the answer to the personal success that you've been looking for all along. Becoming an Coach or Consultant is an entrepreneur's role and the  most effective path to building an empire. And building an empire is a surefire way to achieve your dreams.

If that’s what you want, you have to start somewhere. Becoming an entrepreneur requires committed effort on your part. The Academy for Coaching Parents has been and is an entrepreneurial endeavor But you'll be beyond happy when you’re at the end of the road.

If you have limited entrepreneurial know-how, use this checklist to get on the correct path:

1.Buy into a business and commit wholeheartedly, and for the long haul. This doesn’t necessarily mean putting down financial capital. Make an emotional and educated investment into whatever the business concept may be. Researching your business idea is crucial to success. Is anybody else doing it? What’s the usual market response to similar ideas?

2. Identify a target audience. Who wants your product or service? Naturally, you'll need to be able to identify It's safe to say that a business without a target audience may not do very well! When you determine your target audience upfront, you can focus on building a marketing plan.

3.  Find ways to start It's exciting to have big ideas for your business. But it's also wise to start small. Start researching and designing launch plans, financing, and other key elements to get it going, with plans for expanding as profits allow. Some of today's biggest businesses started as tiny “hole-in-the-wall” operations. For example, Steve Jobs built computers in his garage. This may be the approach for you since it's your first entrepreneurship. Your bank might be offering you impressive financing. But do you really need all that startup capital? Keep your head on and only take what you really need. The less debt you have at the onset, the easier it is to see profits.

4. Think evolution. The businesses with the greatest success are the ones that constantly reinvent You'll need to have that eye of longevity in order to build a good business model. Your business idea might be for bottled water today. But who says it can't evolve to other bottled beverages tomorrow? This is the kind of thought to put into your startup business.

5. Get involved in the process. Getting involved in the process can mean a lot of things, depending on the type of entrepreneurship. Understand the numbers. The dollars and cents are the main determining factors in how well the business is doing. Stay on top of every aspect of the startup project. It's great to have experts on board, but it's an even better idea to know what they're doing! At this point, you’re probably already starting to feel excited! Getting your business idea off the ground is a challenging, but rewarding, experience. Once you stick to this general planning sequence, you'll likely pull it off successfully.

Nobody dreams bigger dreams for you than you do! Live those dreams out and create the empire you always wanted. It's yours for the taking.

Dr. Caron Goode

Dr. Caron Goode

Founder--Academy for Coaching Parents International

Entrepreneurship–Listen to Heart Wisdom

Listen to Heart Wisdom


Entrepreneurship
 is my journal that several coaches suggested I write, not only for myself, but for them. "The lessons of heart wisdom are for everyone," they said. So, here goes.... if you like the lessons or find them helpful, please comment and let me know.

When a web site or a relationship fall apart, do you listen to the Pragmatic Voice, or the Challenger Voice

My friends and I felt good and celebrated surviving the emotional, chaotic energies of 2012. Boy, we should have waited until 2013 to celebrate. Because 15 days into the new year, when the web sites disappeared like an earthquake swallowing a home, my heart broke.

The easiest solution was to turn my back on the whole entrepreneurship mess, walk away, and figure out another way to earn a living. And I had to do it quickly. But that was too easy, and I am a neat person and can't leave a mess behind me. I would always wonder What if?

When the What if? questions start rolling through the mind, they take the form of a personal voice I call The Challenger:  "But what if you DID start over? What if you had new ideas for entrepreneurship? How fast could you make it happen with the right support?" The Challenger was trying to inspire me again.

"Not a problem," said Pragmatic Voice: "When we have new ideas, we will use them, When a tech support person shows up who will work for free, I'll interview them." Ah, voice number 2 is so obviously pragmatic, and kind of kills the joy of being creative and entrepreneurial.

"That's okay," Pragmatic said, "You can think this second voice of yours is a killjoy. But one day you will thank me because this whole web of creativity you opened never stops flowing, and you focus it well when you do focus it, but .... you now need to listen to my common sense, pragmatism for new entrepreneurship ideas?"

I hate it when I lecture myself, but I accepted all of the inner wisdom voices a long time ago, because if I didn't, the inner wisdom nags until I pay attention.

If all in my outer world of entrepreneurship is a reflection of my inner world,  then I need a safe place, and to feel safe. I don't like to make important life decisions from a place of fear. Like the Bengal cat who hangs out for a while, I do things on my time, my intuitive time. Like many sensitive people, the internal timing does manifest when the foundations are right. Sometimes, my creative downloads may take a year to manifest.

[ctt template="5" link="e4349" via="yes" ]"And what happens when you push a project, creating when the heart and gut are saying don't, no, not yet." @parent_coach[/ctt]

Yes, pragmatic voice is right. When I exert my entrepreneurial will into my world, and I am not aligned with the heart feeling about the project, something does go wrong, When I do not listen to the gut level intuition, the organ for assimilating life, walking my talk, something goes wrong. I did that in 2012, thinking my entrepreneurship foundations were solid, running into snags, facing personality issues with my team members, and I stayed the course.

if only you has listened to me, heard me. Like a baby who stops crying when her needs are met, my heart stopped trying to get me to feel out the situation. Instead, I pushed so hard, that my heart energy cracked wide open, vulnerable tears flowed. Surprisingly the tears were of relief. The tears meant that crazy cycle of over-extending self in time, energy and focus was over. 2017 is the year to take one step at a time, insuring that I feel great about each step on the new path of entrepreneurship.

Do you listen to your heart feelings and voice?

When you listen, do you take action or turn away?

Do you hear the Challenger?

Or do you hear the Pragmatist?

 

© 2017 Dr. Caron Goode, Founder of ACPI.

 

 

Behavioral Regulation-2-Administer Small Doses of Fun

Administering fun in small daily doses will be the first challenge for coach and parents alike. After all, what parent thinks about fun when their personal energies are sucked into

  • A perpetual whirlwind of
  • Frequent phone calls from teachers about a child’s behaviors, and
  • Unending fears or concerns for the welfare and future of a child?

 

[ctt template="5" link="CIh11" via="yes" ]This is precisely why activities must be re-introduced in small manageable doses, so as not to cause further overwhelm. @parent_coach[/ctt]

You can be certain that the stress the parent experiences and has experienced, has robbed them of their ability to be creative. Their tolerance levels are stuck in a stress state of inflexibility.

Coaching How To Stretch and have Fun

When, in the course of the coaching relationship, it is time to stretch a client to consider initiating a fun activity with child or family, don’t make them think about it too much. Simplicity makes for an easier transition. Trust me, having to think about it will hurt. The brain under extreme or long-term stress suffers mind-blowing effects, literally!

Stress prevents the frontal cortex in the brain from processing and accessing stored or new information. When you ask, “What can you do to bring more connective fun into your daily lives?” and your client responds with,

  • “I just can’t think!” ,
  • “I’m so confused, I can’t sort it all out!” 
  • “I wouldn’t know where to begin.”

These statements reveal that the frontal cortex is overloaded, and is not immediately capable of making a clear decision. Thus, It makes sense that your client will have a hard time thinking of part or all of a creative plan for fun in the family. Additionally, it may be a case where they just don’t feel like doing it.

When parents are stressed and exhausted, it is difficult for them to ascertain where they will access all this new positive energy you are about to require of them. Coaches make considerations as to the neurophysiology of the parent, as well as the child. Therefore, parents must begin with the simplest of activities. Recall the analogy of the overfilled glass of water or the bucket ready to tip. Use these analogies to help your clients visualize or physically demonstrate where personal stress levels are for them and their child.

Focus on Being Goal Oriented

We are helping the parent to be goal oriented. We want parent’s to experience success and see the measure of their labors. We are not just filling them up with busy time activities because there is a purpose to every action they undertake. With this in mind we:

  • Begin by helping the parent to identify the end goal of the activity.
  • Ask the parent to articulate what they want.
    • They can write it down and then read it back to you. This way mind, heart, and body are fully engaged in the process.
  • What do they want to get? What will they give? What does the outcome look like, as in these four examples:
    • I want this activity to bring our family closer together.
    • I want this activity to help me feel better about my ability to parent in this difficult situation.
    • I want this activity to let my child know how much I love them.
    • This activity will help us communicate better and show that we can still have fun together.

Setting an end goal and keeping it in sight helps the parent to resist giving up when the first few attempts do not go well.

(The prior statement is a huge clue to each of you, that this is a process. Families will experience a learning curve depending upon the amount of conflict or stress in their environment, and with their child.)

  • Discuss a minimum period for a parent to engage actively with child or family. 15- 20 minutes is appropriate.

This recommendation is tailored to the family situation, and may have to be adjusted to meet the parent or child’s needs. For instance, 10 minutes of interaction is a lot for some parents or children, while 30 minutes is a great fit for other families to begin with. A joint determination of the period of time is made by parent and coach depending on the parent/child’s level of stress, and the ability to tolerate new interactions. Keep in mind, that additions to or changes in routines, and conditioned negative expectations of interactions between family members are all transitions, which upset the balance as the child or family knows it now.

Consistency and accountability affords greater success for parents.

See also: Behavioral Regulation 1 and Behavioral Regulation 3

 

Enroll Now in Coaching Families With Special Needs in Behavioral Regulation

First Coaching Session-First Impression

The first coaching session with a client can be up to an hour or two, or even longer if you conduct the Intake Session as your first scheduled meeting. You have to get to know one another on two levels:

  • the sharing information level and
  • the deeper intuitive level.

What is the client seeking: resolve, newness, skills, a mindset, a specific goal, or to solve a problem?
How does the client describe an issue such as participating in it or being a victim of the problem?
As you listen and coach, what are your feelings and thoughts? Review them to ensure you are connecting with your client.
How willing is the client to move ahead as well as dive deeper?

Your Coaching Role

As a coach, you will have a set of ground rules. For example, you might ask for a three-month commitment or require a 24-hours cancellation notice.

Your first session with your client requires setting the standard and the tone for all the sessions. Why does the first impression become important for all future sessions? Your customer's trust, comfort level, inspiration, enthusiasm, and motivation will indicate the comfort level in confiding and engaging in the conversation with you.

You are in charge of setting the format of the session--how you start and conclude, as well as using probing questions. As the coach, you have to focus the content of the meeting. You could offer a free initial consultation to explore a client's coaching needs. The initial session could be from 45 to 90 minutes.

Your goal as a parent coach is to explain what you do, the liability factors, and expectations. The parent-coach alliance includes asking questions, listening, reflecting, and defining goals or expectations together.

The Client's Role

On the other hand, the client brings the content, the dialogue, to the coaching session. The client leads the way to the more pressing matters to discuss or that require coaching.

When customers answer your questions, they could reveal personal desires, problems, or goals. A free first session is an excellent selling tool. The client's risk is small compared to the tremendous benefits to find out how coaching can support the client's efforts.

Use the second meeting to complete any agenda items from the previous meeting. Continue to build a positive rapport with your client and enhance their comfort level.

Both coach and client, within two practical sessions, can complete these tasks:

1. Explain the coaching process which includes reviewing and agreeing to the terms of the coach-client contract or agreement.
2. Take care of business issues: payments, how to make payments, time commitments, and the protocol for the sessions.
2. The client focuses on coaching goals or achievements, or processes like problem-solving, or exploring core temperaments. In other words, what does your client want?
3. Establishing rapport is best done by knowing your customer's core temperament. Part of the coaching role is to shift your attention and communication to their particular temperament(s) and establish a positive rapport.
4. Determine how you and the client communicate.
5. Determine a client's intentions.
6. Confirm in writing or verbally that the customer demonstrates willingness, commitment, time, and agrees to actions while you schedule coaching.

Behavioral Regulation-3-Choose Successful Play Activities

Play Activities Contribute to Bonding & Regulation 

  • Coach, clinician, and parents choose an activity the parent believes will be most successful. 

That is, the parent believes they have the ability, skills and presence to initiate the activity, invite and prepare the child and family for positive interaction, and equally include each family member. The parenting coach and parent join in accessing and reinforcing abilities. For instance: Help the parent gauge stress levels and practice self-calming breathing before the activity.

Parent and Coach Role Play Words

  • Gathering the family, (“As soon as you complete your homework and Dad walks the dog, we will begin game night! You can make the popcorn!”)
  • Eliciting the child’s cooperation, (“Where do you want to sit so you will feel safe and comfortable? Do you want to sit near Mommy?”)
  • Words or phrases that convey inclusion, affection, or safety. (“We are glad you can join with us and play rather than stay alone in your room.”)

The parent must also be able to arrange the environment to facilitate their child’s success according to their child’s particular needs. For instance: Perhaps cell phones need to be turned off so as not to draw any family member away from the play activity. Kindles, tablets, gaming systems or other technology need to be put away to limit distraction. Positive ground rules or guidelines are established prior to beginning. This is what you, as a coach, will discuss with the parents before they introduce new activities to the family. You might ask them; “Looking ahead - What can you do to orchestrate success and help prevent a catastrophe?”

  • Can the parent pull from their resources and strategies to adjust the environment to help insure greater success?
  • What can the parent do to create safety?
  • Can the coach and parent pace an enjoyable game and then escalate the skills for a child over activities?

For example, if the parent knows their child has difficulty with close physical proximity to other family members, or, that their anxiety levels rise with increased expectations (even when they are positive in nature) resulting in undesirable behavior.

Attend to the Environment

  • Do lights need lowering?
  • Will soft music or deep breathing help with the regulation of excitement the child feels?
  • Does the child need to participate while sitting on a balance ball, or handling a fidget toy?
  • Does the child or family need a slower paced activity to begin, or one that will appropriately help release the child’s pent up energy?
  • Encourage parents to think like a kid!
  • Ask whether the parent is able to share a game or activity they remember loving when they were their child’s age. Again, this will be a challenge for some parents.
  • The coach encourages a parent to examine the roadblocks they experience preventing them from moving into a playful relationship with their child, rather than a blaming, grudging, and resentful relationship.

I mentioned earlier that some parent’s just don’t feel like participating. Fun! Bah, humbug! Consider this a normal reaction. It is the culmination of so much internal pain, hurt feelings and disappointment. It is part and parcel of the confusion and rejection the parent feels from the child, and perhaps, disappointment in themselves.

  • What is holding you back?
  • Where do your fears linger?
  • What could be the result when you decide to do this?
  • What will happen if you don’t do anything?

Regulate the parent first. Coaches help parents apply and practice self-calming, stress management and grounding or centering strategies by asking: What can you do right now, to organize and regulate your inner body and mind so you can make a clear decision you feel good about, and help your family to enjoy this time together?

Consistency and accountability affords greater success for parents.

See also: Behavioral Regulation 1 and Behavioral Regulation 2

Enroll Now in Coaching Families With Special Needs in Behavioral Regulation