Coach Online–Marketing Tips and Ideas to Make Money Online

To make money online as a parent-family coach or an ACPI Trainer, you need to market your business online. The following marketing tips and ideas will guide your marketing efforts.

  1. When you decide who you want to work with, keep narrowing down your ideal client to a specific niche or group. Don’t send a marketing message to a general group. Specifically target the demographic you want to work with.

Narrow it down like this example:  Dads....of teens....preparing to graduate from high school....who need a Core Temperament Inventory.....to consider career choices.

2.  Talk about your business everywhere. Network with prospective clients. Give speeches at conferences. Clearly articulate your value when talking about your business in a video presentation for online viewing. 

3. Write about your business in blog posts, newsletters, magazines and newspapers. A case study presents your strengths in helping a client. You could also discuss group coaching and when and how you offer services. Sell value! Send out a press release when you add a new service or you are just starting your business.

4. Be active on social media. Participate by answering questions, providing helpful information and being authentic. Over the last three years and the changes made to social media offering, Facebook still remain primary. Facebook also bought Instagram, and placing an ad on both sites bring traffic to you and your web site. 

5. Create a professional looking website. Include your services, testimonials and an about you page as well as the home page. 

6. While I do not advocate free sessions, you will notice in reading blogs that it is a popular way to meet new possible clients. Give away a free coaching session and see which  prospective clients  go on to purchase a bigger package.

7. Build a strong client list. Keep in contact with them, asking for referrals and testimonials.

8. Send out a regular newsletter and update your blog regularly.

9. Comment on other blogs and social media channels with relevant information. These types of connections, formed through social media, are reciprocated when you support others and ask for the same. 

10. Get interviewed by a well-known person in your niche. Promote your coaching services during the interview.

11. Create YouTube videos with helpful information. Include links to your coaching services.

12. Include a link to your website on everything, including your email signature.

Marketing is a necessity in any business for making money online. It is how clients will find you.

The Next Step

Making money online with your coaching business can be done in many ways. It’s about how you package yourself as an expert, the marketing plan you create to get the word out about your services and the different types of services and products you offer. Your next step is to decide on your market, plan out your marketing, determine how you are going to make money, and begin attracting clients.

1. Parent Coaching

Does Parent Coaching interest you as a profession or an extra source of income? This series about coaching parents provides all you need to know about what is involved in the real profession of coaching. You have a story to tell which defines your interest and happiness in helping people.

People pay coaches to help them reach their goals by encouraging, celebrating, and listening to them on a regularly scheduled basis.  Sessions might be for individuals or for groups.. A coach is an empowerment expert who challenges, stimulates, questions, and holds the client in positive regard. A coach takes the side of the clients and helps them set long and short-term goals, and holds them accountable to take necessary steps to achieve the goals from week to week. The coaching process enables people to lead more effective lives,  and to achieve what they want more quickly. Here is what two top coaches say about their field:

   "You have to have a plan and it has to be a plan that works.  You should not settle for the mediocre in life.  Coaching helps you set goals.  I collaborate with my clients.  I am on their side.  As a coach, I help and strategize with my clients so they can achieve their goals. [bctt tweet="Coaching is about personal evolution, vision, what’s next, what’s now, and moving forward. It’s about having standards, not settling for the mediocre in life, but looking and feeling your best." …Annemarie Brown" username="parent_coach"]

"Coaching is about listening, empathizing, asking questions and sharing love. It is very personal, very individual and case-by-case. People can turn their problems around.  They can be whatever they want.  They can have whatever they want. Coaching is about that process.  You help them and it is an incredible job."    Peggy Alvarado

Coaching Started In Business

Coaching as a profession started in corporate businesses, but also takes its models from counseling and psychotherapy. Business managers have always been “coaches” in that they helped people clarify their goals and choose roles in the corporation that best suited their talents and strengths.  Many life coaches, if they do not come from a background in psychotherapy or counseling, originally worked in business.

   I worked in management for thirteen years in a Fortune 500 company. Human resource management is very similar to coaching.  I didn’t know I was coaching back then, but I was!  … Peggy Alvarado

Businesses paid the first coaches to guide new hires as they climbed the corporate ladder.  A coach could be internal, someone who works for the same business as the client; or external like someone who is hired by the business as an outside consultant.  These first coaches were called business mentors. A coach or mentor is an older person with a lot of experience in the same field of the beginner.  The coach guides the new hire to set career goals, interact with other people, and choose the right projects to advance themselves. In the 1980s, businesses started routinely to hire and pay for more outside coaches.

Today, a business coach at the top of his field can earn as much as $700 tp $1000 per hour, or well into six figures per year.  Some large corporations keep coaches on retainer, paying them so much a month to mentor a constant stream of new hires.  A new trend is to hire a coach for a specific job, such as “Improve morale in the accounting department within a three- month-time period.”

Because business coaches work with each person on a one-to-one basis and take into consideration each individual’s personality and style, they are very successful in helping people achieve goals and move up in their careers quickly. A coach expert listens within, has only the best interest of that particular client in mind. The relationship is confidential and trustworthy.

The coaching model was so successful on a business level that a demand arose for personal “life coaches” as well.  A life coach or personal coach is a person who helps a client set goals for his or her future, determine steps to reach each goal, and cheer the person as he or she moved toward his or her definition of success. The goals do not have to be about money or career, but can be goals like “To become closer to my husband,” “To make time for painting,” or simply “To have more fun.”

Unlike business coaches, a life coach for parents could work over the telephone instead of face-to-face in an office setting.

The average personal coach charges above $100 per hour, but the range of fees is from a low of $25 to a high of $300 or more. A personal coach at the top of the field can make in the range of six to seven figures per year range, but the vast majority of coaches earn about $40,000 to $80,000 annually, depending on their part-time or full-time focus in the coaching field.

Coaching Moved away From The Medical Model

In 1992, Thomas Leonard started the first training institute for coaches.  His “Coach University” trained people through teleconferences.  In the same year, Laura Whitworth founded The Coaches Training Institute in San Francisco, which provided training through weekend universities.  Whitworth’s association, the Personal and Professional Coaches Association, merged with Leonard’s International Coach Federation (ICF) in 1997. The ICF organization developed standards of ethics and practices for the profession.

Yet from the beginning of the coaching profession, there was a lot of overlap between psychotherapy and coaching.  For one thing, many people entering the new field of coaching had backgrounds as therapists or business. Yet in time, coaching has moved away from the medical model.

Isn’t it great that you don’t have to be a psychologist or a medical professional to be a parent coach? Let’s take a look at our parent coaching certifications and get going on the way to success:

Parent-Family Coaching Programs

Dr. Caron Goode

Dr. Caron Goode

Founder of the Academy for Coaching Parents

CHECK OUT THIS NEW ONLINE COACHING PROGRAM

FOR PARENTING AND FAMILIES

Free Course–Step Seven–Setting Boundaries

Even with a clear communication plan and format in place, your client may push the limits. Setting boundaries is a primary task for your peach of mind and your client's best coaching experience.  

  • Clients may keep you on the phone longer than you intended
  • They will email you more than is allowed
  • They might text you for non-emergencies
  • They will send you messages on Facebook, on Twitter, on Voxer, or anywhere else that is convenient for them—regardless of your preferences

Does This Work Both Ways?

Are you tempted to reach out on the weekend to answer a question or schedule a call on a Sunday afternoon because that's when your client is available. You might think this is good business—after all, you're building a relationships.

The idea is not the best for you. The situation will lead to burn out because your boundaries are weak.  You'll always feel like you must do more for your clients. Sooner or later, you'll lose touch with your own health and personal space.

Setting boundaries is the answer for both you and your customers. Establish from the outset exactly what your coaching package includes, and be sure to include when contact takes place.

 For example, you might say:

Your coaching package includes one monthly, 50-minute phone call with me and one question by email each working day.

 My workdays are Monday through Thursday from 10 am to 4 pm Eastern, and I'll answer all calls and emails during that time.

With this format, you are setting boundaries and have included 

  • What the client gets (one phone call and once daily emails)
  • When she gets it (Monday through Thursday from 10 am to 4 pm)

You’ll also need to establish exactly how your clients should contact you, and what will happen if they do not follow the procedures. Setting boundaries includes  specific email addresses and phone numbers or conference lines exclusively for your client use.

Another step is to create “planned responses” to send out when a client attempts to contact you outside of your established boundaries.. For example, if you receive a Facebook message (and you don’t offer this as a form of contact) you might respond with:

Thank you for reaching out, and I'm happy to help you with this big issue. For better organization of my client files, though, I do ask that you send all your questions to my email address at yourname@yourdomain.com.

A gentle reminder for setting boundaries creates a better coaching relationship for both of you.

To keep phone calls shorter, use a simple kitchen timer. At the start of the call, tell your client, "We have XX minutes today, so I'm going to set a timer for YY minutes to remind us when it's almost time to end. That will help ensure I can answer all your questions."

Then set your timer for 5 minutes before the call is to end. When the timer goes off, let your client know you have 5 minutes remaining, and ask if she has any final questions before you hang up. Following this simple system will prevent those endless phone calls that trample all forms of boundaries. 

Resist the temptation to allow calls to be booked outside of your working hours, or to respond to questions on the weekend, or to book additional appointments "just this once." 

Doing so will make it appear to your client that your boundaries are flexible, and will invite them to push the limits as well. After all, if you email on the weekend, it must be ok, right?

 

Exercise: Map Your Work Hours

 

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat

6am

 

Exercise: Craft Your Boundary Responses

How will you set the expectation at the start of a call, so it does not run too long?

How will you respond if a client contacts you outside your established system?

What will you tell yourself when you fail to respect your own boundaries?

 

Free Course–Step Six–Determining Your Price

Having trouble pricing your coaching program? A coach's difficult decision to make when determining your price is to consider value to your client and the your time not only to prepare, but also to coach.. 

Beginning coaches in all niches tend to price their time, content and value to the client way too low. You might charge as little as $97/month, while top business coaches can easily command $40,000, $50,000 or even $100,000 per year. Where will your program fit? A variety of factors affects this answer, such as:

  1. A year-long program is costlier than a 6-week offer.
  2. Certain industries, such as business, can demand higher price tags than others.Determining your price by comparison includes the value and end result for your clients. 
  3. Beginners will be less likely to shell out big bucks for coaching than will more advanced clients.
  4. If your result includes an increase in profits for business, then a higher-priced program is possible.

In addition to these elements, consider comparable programs from your coaching colleagues. What do they offer and for how much?

Exercise: Determining Your Program Price for Length 

Note: You can create multiple levels here as well. For example, you might offer both a 3-month and a six-month program.

Program Duration

Cost

Free Course –Free Course-Step-One-How to Formulate Your Coaching Procedures

Do you have a plan for coaching procedures for your business? The most efficient ways to deliver new business strategies and increase your coaching income are the goals for this blog course.

  • Do you have a stand-alone coach training program?
  • Do you have a group coaching program you offer weekly or monthly?

If you already have these types of programs, then your clients might be ready for the in-depth one-to-one coaching program. The package is a "top of the funnel" offer when establishing coaching procedures. 

Your clients would have read your free blog articles, perhaps participated in a group program, or enjoyed an online course. They know you and recognize your work. They know your value, and they'll be more than willing to pay for continued access to you. Moreover, your business experiences make you the perfect person to work with other emerging, talented business women. Your next step is to formalize the coaching package and make it available for sale.

The real value of private coaching is the influence you have and the impact you make on the lives of those you coach.
With group coaching or self-study programs, it's difficult to know how many people are putting your expertise to work for them.

In a private coaching program, you'll be connecting with clients one-on-one, and you'll see what's providing the most useful results.
Private coaching offers a highly rewarding relationship for both you and your customers.

STEP ONE -->

"Get Clear on the Problem You Solve"

As with every aspect of your business, your private coaching package must be highly targeted to be successful. You cannot just hang out your virtual shingle, call yourself a coach, and expect clients to line up for an appointment. Rather, to position yourself as the expert you are, become crystal clear on exactly:

• WHAT you do
• WHO you do it for
• HOW you want to do it
• WHICH emotional results and tangible changes can you offer and guarantee.

When you can articulate the exact problems, you solve and who you work with, it will be much easier to find your tribe and attract buyers for your program. For example, business coaches might focus on solving:

• Money mindset issues for women entrepreneurs
• Brand development for health and wellness coaches
• Marketing help for information product sellers
• Outsourcing problems for online businesses
• Life coaches solve different issues.
• Dating coaches have their particular area of expertise. Executive coaches focus on C-level employees.

You have your sweet spot, too, and it’s probably easy to identify.

Specialized Niche: You already know your general area of expertise, whether it's business, life, health, finance, parenting or personal growth.

Target Client Persona: Now think about who your favorite clients are. And if you don’t yet have clients, think about those you’ve helped in the past in any way—even if it’s through email or on social media.

• With whom did you most enjoy working?
• What problems were you happiest to solve?
• Which issues (and people) left you feeling frustrated and stressed out?
• Those questions belong in your coaching package.
• Who are your tribe members?These are the people for whom you're building your 1:1 package.

Next, consider what this client's biggest issue is. It's your ideal client's most pressing problem, the one she most needs to solve, and the one she will gladly pay to fix. Maybe her blog doesn’t get enough traffic. Perhaps her online dating profiles aren’t attracting her dream man. Or maybe her finances are out of control. Whatever the problem is, you have the answer and can help her find her answer. When you can craft a coaching package that gets results for your ideal client, you'll have a winning program. People will line up to enroll.

EXERCISE: DESCRIBE YOUR IDEAL CLIENT

If you haven't already done this exercise, spend some time defining your ideal customer. This exercise finalizes the coaching procedures you will put in place for automation. Explain everything you know about her, including her experience level, her dreams, her family life, her frustrations, her income, and anything else that will set her apart from millions of other potential clients. (Use additional sheets if needed.)

EXERCISE: STATE HER BIGGEST PROBLEM

Now that you've identified who your client is, the next steps are:

• Define her big issue concisely as possible, like
• Struggles with self-esteem
• Lacks confidence
• Struggles to lose weight
• Desires to explore relations

 

Go To Step Two -->