Tool-Ideal Coaching Clients 3 Checklist

The easiest way a parent coach knows coaching clients is to understand their current problems and needs.

One of the conditions for someone to hire you as their parent coach or family coach is that they believe you can help them with their problem, be a better person, help them change their parenting behaviors, etc.

If you know how the ideal client defines her problem, you can show that expertise in your writing, web site, and  through talks, and blog articles. It is important for her to know you can help her. It is more important to show her how you do that, and this checklist clarifies information.

Generalized Information

Living situation (where, what type of place, with whom) Occupation Work situation (position, income, general job description)

Who is she close to?

What is her relationship with her family?

Where does her family live?

What is her core temperament type?

What size is her body (wt, ht)?

Hair color and style?

Eye color?

Habits

Does she exercise? How and how often?

What does she do for fun, hobbies? What does she do on weekends? Does she eat out or eat in more?

If she eats out quite a bit, at what types of places?

What is her name?

Thoughts or Questions

What keeps her up worrying at night? (This is a key question for you to ask yourself about your ideal client.)

Most importantly: what precipitated her calling for an appointment now?

How would she describe her problem?

How would she answer the question: What would you like from parent coaching

Tool–Defining Your Ideal Client 1

Why would a parent coach or a family coach take particular care in defining the type of person who would be their best customer or client?

Influencing Factors

1: Relationship research suggests that if we are relatively healthy in mindset and emotionality, we attract people, who are similar to us in Emotional patterns, Cultural preferences, Levels of empathy

2. Also, core temperaments influence whom we meet with and coach. Are you the personality type that can be authentic with all four temperaments? Can you work with the types of person who

  • Make excuses
  • Cancel appointments
  • Want to talk about it, and not do much about it
  • Becomes angry at you rather than the issue

3. Likewise, our values influence the decisions we make about our business and ideal clients.
This values of your ideal client affects everything you do from setting fees to determining your coaching programs, which will offer solutions to their problems and value to living an inspired life.

4. Spend your time on the most valuable task to make your business successful by defining your ideal client.

  • Age group
  • Income
  • Family status
  • Education
  • Lifestyle goals
  • Location

To make this list real, a clever trick of successful authors is to write a story. Authors write about their ideal reader, and you write about the client who is most compatible with you. You give her a name, a couple of kids, a husband who just doesn’t get it, and a load of student loans. You know quite a bit about her, you think.
If you stop there, you may be missing a huge piece of the puzzle—and losing out on the best clients because of temperament incompatibility.

Temperament Style Mismatch

The topic is rarely considered in the “ideal client” equation, and it’s arguably the most important part: core temperament style.

If you’re bossy, sarcastic, fun-loving and loud, then a quiet, middle-aged mom who spends her time volunteering at the church is probably not a good fit for you. WHY?

  • Natural exuberance may overwhelm the person.
  • If a client needs to start with small steps, and you whiz to the finish line, you’ve left the client in the dust.
  • Either he will be uncomfortable with your style, or you’ll be miserable trying to reign in your natural exuberance.

Drive Determines Success

Check in with your client about their drive to success.

Adaptive Supporter type clients are slower to take the initiative, although they always meet their goal.  An achiever may be internally motivated but could move too fast and fail to plan adequately for meeting his goals. Both clients can be frustrating to coach unless you understand the core temperaments and what motivates each person to succeed.

Review your current and past coaching clients, and you’ll identify the disposition patterns of those you attract. Review:
What characteristics did your most enjoyable client bring to the table?
What time frame do you expect a customer to meet their goals?
Which client behavioral patterns are those you do not want to deal with?
How do you handle your disappointment?
How do you celebrate your client’s successes?

Compare your new potential clients to this ideal profile, and you’ll never again sign on with a less-than-perfect client.

2. Use Storytelling In Your Online Business

Storytelling is a great tool when you’re marketing online. You…

Connect with your audience.
Share a message without sounding too salesy.
Open your heart to allow your readers to know, like, and trust you.
Offer a product or service that fits your client profile.

Start With The End In Mind

Every story has a purpose or a moral if you will. Start by writing down the moral of your story. If a moral or purpose aren’t clear yet, then start with a simple goal.

What is the purpose of your story?
What do you want your listeners to do after you’ve finished the story?
What action do you want them to take?
Once you know the goal, it’s easier to craft the story.

Know Your Audience

You know what you want to accomplish with your story. Now think about your audience. You need a good grasp of patterns, habits, motivations, responses, preferences.

How do you do this? Through administering in your coaching session a Core Temperament Style Inventory. The purpose of this test is to discover your inherent traits, emotions, stress patterns, learning preferences and your orientation to living.

It doesn’t matter if you’ll use your story in a business presentation, a blog post, an email or a sales page. You need to have a good grasp on who your audience is to ensure you can tell a story that’s meaningful to them. Think about what you share with your audience. Those are the experiences you want to pull from for your stories.

Make It Personal

Don’t be afraid to make it personal. Once you find that connection, it should be relatively easy to come up with a story based on facts and events from your real life. Using real life stories helps you make a deeper connection with your audience. You’ll sound more authentic and more believable.

Why is this important? It helps you build trust with your readers, and they will be more likely to take you up on any product recommendations you make.

Make It Memorable

The best stories are the ones we can hear and then remember well enough to share. To make a story memorable make it short and to the point, but also try to evoke emotion. We remember things better when our feelings get involved. Surprise your readers, make them laugh, or bring them to tears with your stories. Either scenario will make sure they remember the story along with you and your brand.

Practice, Practice, Practice

This last tip may be the most important. While we all have a little storyteller inside us, telling stories to market our business isn’t something that comes naturally to us. The trick for getting good at it is to practice. Start writing and telling stories about anything and everything. Share your favorites with your audience and just keep at it.

The more you practice storytelling in your business, using the tips shared here, the better you’ll get. It’s a powerful tool to have and well worth the time and effort it takes to become an effective storyteller.

First Coaching Session-First Impression

The first coaching session with a client can be up to an hour or two, or even longer if you conduct the Intake Session as your first scheduled meeting. You have to get to know one another on two levels:

  • the sharing information level and
  • the deeper intuitive level.

What is the client seeking: resolve, newness, skills, a mindset, a specific goal, or to solve a problem?
How does the client describe an issue such as participating in it or being a victim of the problem?
As you listen and coach, what are your feelings and thoughts? Review them to ensure you are connecting with your client.
How willing is the client to move ahead as well as dive deeper?

Your Coaching Role

As a coach, you will have a set of ground rules. For example, you might ask for a three-month commitment or require a 24-hours cancellation notice.

Your first session with your client requires setting the standard and the tone for all the sessions. Why does the first impression become important for all future sessions? Your customer’s trust, comfort level, inspiration, enthusiasm, and motivation will indicate the comfort level in confiding and engaging in the conversation with you.

You are in charge of setting the format of the session–how you start and conclude, as well as using probing questions. As the coach, you have to focus the content of the meeting. You could offer a free initial consultation to explore a client’s coaching needs. The initial session could be from 45 to 90 minutes.

Your goal as a parent coach is to explain what you do, the liability factors, and expectations. The parent-coach alliance includes asking questions, listening, reflecting, and defining goals or expectations together.

The Client’s Role

On the other hand, the client brings the content, the dialogue, to the coaching session. The client leads the way to the more pressing matters to discuss or that require coaching.

When customers answer your questions, they could reveal personal desires, problems, or goals. A free first session is an excellent selling tool. The client’s risk is small compared to the tremendous benefits to find out how coaching can support the client’s efforts.

Use the second meeting to complete any agenda items from the previous meeting. Continue to build a positive rapport with your client and enhance their comfort level.

Both coach and client, within two practical sessions, can complete these tasks:

1. Explain the coaching process which includes reviewing and agreeing to the terms of the coach-client contract or agreement.
2. Take care of business issues: payments, how to make payments, time commitments, and the protocol for the sessions.
2. The client focuses on coaching goals or achievements, or processes like problem-solving, or exploring core temperaments. In other words, what does your client want?
3. Establishing rapport is best done by knowing your customer’s core temperament. Part of the coaching role is to shift your attention and communication to their particular temperament(s) and establish a positive rapport.
4. Determine how you and the client communicate.
5. Determine a client’s intentions.
6. Confirm in writing or verbally that the customer demonstrates willingness, commitment, time, and agrees to actions while you schedule coaching.

Pin It on Pinterest

Emotional Intelligence Expert Training