How to Parent the Whole Child

Parenting the whole child implies that we honor our children’s wholeness while we dissect and discuss the parts of the whole—physical body, mind, emotions and spirit. It may indeed be paradoxical, but it’s our way of understanding how the parts contribute to the whole and our job if we work with parents, families, and children.

We consider our children’s wholeness when we:

  • Bear in mind the emotional and mental factors that contribute to strep throat.
  • Look to a biochemical problem associated with a child’s temper
  • Consider the negative self-talk and thoughts that can float around in the head of a depressed teen.
  • Regard childhood patterns from a holistic perspective. These can include a child who falls down all the time, one who has allergies, one who is shy and sensitive, one who doesn’t want to be touched, and so on. We want to help, but do we help their biochemistry, their behavior or their spirit?
  • Think about how children spend their time, and if their activities are balanced between stimulation and quiet.

Bundles of Energy

The foundation of whole-child parenting is understanding that our children are bundles of energy in the form of thoughts, physical activity, emotional expression and spirit. Rather than thinking about managing our children, think about managing their energy.

The energy of the body needs food, touch, air and water. The energy of the emotions needs positive input like optimism, smiles and support. The energy of thought needs inspiration and imagination, or it gets bored. The energy of the spirit needs connection, faith, compassion and quiet. It needs calm moments of awareness.

Most of us know these things and have our own intuitive ways of mothering and fathering our children. In fact, the joy of parenting the whole child is discovering how much you already know and do. The ease of whole-child parenting is that when one avenue doesn’t work, there is always another way. For example, because we know that the nature of emotional energy can be chaotic, we can find several ways to structure and channel positive emotional energy with our child. We might follow schedules, share meals, read books or see a heart-warming movie.

A Soul Living in a Child’s Body

 Thinking of a child as an “energy bundle” helps us take our parenting less personally when a child screams, “I hate you.” What we want to take to heart is that this soul is living with us in a child’s body. We are responsible for helping this child to develop in the best, most fulfilling way possible.

Parenting is really about educating the mind and body so our children are happy, successful and healthy in body and soul. Working with the mind-body connection is the foundation for parenting the whole child.

If you read this post till the end, you probably are kind of person who wants to help folks live to their maximum potential. Your hunger for having an influence on people forced you to read this article and much more that you already read. It’s just the right time to take a step further and become a certified parent coach and give your purpose a meaning. Have a look at our coaching certification and decide which one suits your talents best..

See also Coaching Whole-Parent and Whole Child 1 and  Coaching Whole-Parent and Whole Child 2

Parent-Family Coaching Programs

 

Strengthen Your Emotional Resilience and Bounce Back

Emotional resilienceenables you to bounce back after difficult experiences. Fortunately, this is a skill that you can develop to get through stressful times with greater ease.

Here are some of the benefits of becoming more emotionally resilient and a few strategies for developing this very helpful skill.

 

The Benefits of Becoming More Emotionally Resilient

Experience greater happiness. Adversity is to be expected but you can control your emotional reaction. By putting the best face on things, you'll see the opportunities for learning and growth that come with challenging situations. A positive attitude will also help you recover from disappointments more quickly

.Make progress towards your life goals. Complications will arise throughout your life. Being flexible makes it easier to accept and surmount the obstacles that arise in your path. For example, if one scholarship fails to come through, explore other options for financing your college education.

Strengthen your relationships. People are naturally drawn to happy people. You're likely to have more harmonious relationships if you can keep up your spirits. By contrast, depression often makes others feel like withdrawing.

Boost your self-esteem. Becoming more adaptable helps you accomplish more. In turn, those accomplishments and healthy relationships make you feel more confident.

Act responsibly. Under pressure, you may feel tempted to get angry or hurt or act out. Emotional resilience helps you to keep your composure and makes you less prone to saying something that you might regret.

Cultivating a calm mind helps your immune system keep you healthy. Studies show that managing stress can even help you maintain your cognitive functions as you age.

Methods for Becoming More Emotionally Resilient

Know your purpose in life. It's a big endeavor, but discovering your purpose in life is fundamental to your ability to navigate challenges. A mission motivates you.

Set realistic goals and make specific plans. Some things are beyond your control, but smart planning can enhance your stability. Set goals you can achieve and break them down into easy steps.

Be aware of your emotions. If you can be mindful of what you're feeling, you can give yourself permission to evaluate the situation before reacting. Moreover, deep breathing provides some time to see a constructive solution before getting angry, hurt, or being irrational.

Practice patience and persistence. Make a commitment to yourself to see things through even when difficulties arise. For example, if you get declined after one job interview, transfer your energies to the next opportunity.

Slow down. Sometimes you get more done by slowing down. Lack of sleep or perpetual multi-tasking can cause stress and irritating tension. Give yourself a break to refresh your brain and your body.

Act happy. Just trying to appear happier can help you lift your mood after a setback. Treat yourself to a funny movie or call a friend who helps you laugh.

Learn to ask for help. Make it easier for your loved ones to support you. Practice asking for help in a respectful manner while being specific about what you need.

Be generous. The more you give to others, the more likely they are to reciprocate in your time of need and the better you'll feel about yourself.

Emotional resilience is a powerful asset for accomplishing more in life.

 

 

1. Storytelling for Business

Stories work in marketing, and especially in coaching. Each parent you coach has their personal story and their parent story. You will find the different story themes in commercials and in the way brands present themselves. Storytelling is especially helpful in parent coaching and family coaching. Each person has their story, their version of how they happened.

Sharing and telling stories work well for online marketers.

The hardest part of telling a story is figuring out what to say. It's not easy to come up with a good storyline when you're staring at a blank screen. The solution is to stick with one of the tried and true basic story plots and tweak from there. Here are three of the most popular ones.

1. Good Vs. Evil

1. Let's start with the big good vs. evil theme. Most fairy tales use this storyline as do fiction books like Harry Potter series. You'll also see in television programs that the story line follows a pattern.

You accept a challenge
You face adversity In coaching, the adversary may be a quality in a client to name and tame, or perhaps you have had a personal problem with procrastination that you want to reprogram for better business success.

2. A second pattern is a transformation. Similar to the previous, this plot features an inner change, instead of changing the outer form. You may find this theme often in your clients. You may have your personal transformation story.

Here is an example of my conversion story:

I had waited too long to seek treatment for a growing, painful condition with my right ovary. I thought I could handle it, but I had no clear understanding of the problem. My new, young, inexperienced gynecologist explained to me that the ovary had turned in on itself and was necrotic, in short, dead. She scheduled my surgery immediately with her professor, also a surgeon.

After surgery, I died in the clinical sense. I had closed my eyes and instantly opened my eyes in brilliant white light in which I floated. I was delighted to be there, experiencing the transition with consciousness. The experience made evident that I was to "take on a new task," explained the voice. The result was my formulation of the Academy for Coaching Parents International which took about three years to get off the ground.

2. The Reluctant Hero Returns

This storyline should sound familiar too. The boy leaves home, builds his fortune while he's away, or learns something important. Then the hero comes back to share the discovered wealth or knowledge. Along the way, he might just save the day. Does that sound like a Western or romantic comedy you've seen lately?

With this storyline, you can share your personal story of how you discovered your chosen niche. Maybe you're the gluten-free expert because your child was diagnosed with Celiac Disease, and you and your family had to find a way to live with it.

3. Rags To Riches

This storyline also shouldn't come as a surprise. You've seen it in a million forms from Cinderella to Shark Tank. The idea is to share how you went from nothing to where you're at today. It's the quintessential American story.

This storyline works well when you're sharing how you've made your money online. If you're marketing to marketers or business to business, this is the storyline you'll use more than any other. The story line is not limited to the "making money'" market. Tweak the same storyline and share:
1. how you found more time in your day,
2. how you organize your office or your writing,
3. how you found your faith, your courage, or your self-esteem.

Any journey of growth could become a "rags to riches storyline.

What is your story? Which category for storytelling best suits you? Please answer in the comments below so I can learn what stories you would like to read.