Nine Tips On Understanding Your Teen

Your child becomes a teenager and parenting can suddenly turn into a frustrating experience. You are understanding your child from a different viewpoint in the circle of life. You could observe:

  • That the harmony is gone in your relationship.
  • You find yourself in disagreement with your child.
  • You feel the so-called generation gap grew.

Yes, your child is changing, but the basic temperament is still there. Understanding your teen is still the key to having a harmonious relationship. These ten tips for understanding your teen and dealing with the new brain wiring will help you stay centered as a heartwise® parent.

While you used to pal around with your child when he or she was younger, you now have to set boundaries between your role as a parent or a friend.

1.Help stabilize the changes.

At this stage, you are primarily the circumspect parent who will listen, negotiate boundaries and behaviors, and stand steadfast in your expectations. Doing so helps stabilize all the changes the adolescent experiences. Friends can be found, but good parenting is a rare commodity these days.

2. Become Involved

Understanding your child as a teen means becoming involved while your schedule and life remain just as busy. Being involved is finding the time to be with them. Being involved means knowing where they are at all times and establishing communication protocols.

Even more important are the conversations about life your teen appreciates. These conversations open opportunities to understanding your child, as their thoughts and feelings change each day, disappear, and flare again: Listen to the what your child tells you about their life events. You will glean their thoughts and feelings so that they will be at ease coming to you if they are in trouble.

3. Train Teens in Accountability Skills

Understanding your teen

You as the parent, are responsible for preparing your child for adult life for as long as they live under your roof.
If they want something, exert the effort to achieve it or get it.
Being responsible for communication, earned expenses, and tasks is now their domain.
Money is not the important asset. Rather, qualities about handling money are what matters.
As a parent, you can help here by providing their allowance for completed jobs, but they must do their part. You are training them to survive in a competitive world.

4. Listen To Them

The teen years are crucial years for understanding your child. Teens expect you to hear them and decipher what they need or want. You may feel like judgments arise surrounding teen activities, finances, and studies. Don't worry because 99% of the job is listening to them and understanding what they want.

5. Explain Your Viewpoint

By letting teens know the reasons for any decisions you make, you empower them to make their choices. Offering them a reason, even if it considered lame by your teen, helps them review their personal choices. For example
Concern for their safety is why you establish a mutually agreed on curfew.
Your need to know where they are if they leave one place for a new destination requires a phone call to know they are safe and capable of holding their own among peers.

6. Tune In

Understanding your child occurs when you are
listening to their kind of music
keeping tabs on what activities they are involved in
Knowing the names of their friends

7. Be Flexible

Setting agreed-upon rules with your teen is always healthy. However, exceptions to rules always occur. Whether you are flexible enough to bend the rules requires discussion with your teen. Lay the groundwork for those instances when rules can be adjusted.

8. Share Your Interest With Your Child

Sharing interests with your child means you better understand them You learn together and share your experiences. You need to stay connected with your child through those teen arguments.

9. Keep Talking Even If Your Teen Is Not Listening

Teenagers do listen to their parents. While they may argue with you, your advice is well-entrenched in their minds. After all, you did raise them. Although they pretend passivity with what you say, the truth is that your advice has influence.

Why Your Coaching Mindset and Temperament Matter for Your Success

Can you see the one attribute critical for personal and professional success? What makes coaches so credible with clients and successful in business? Charisma, experience, and expertise are at the top of the list. 

It's true. In every action your take in business or life, your mindset is the determining factor which influences your success. Your coaching mindset and plans require the same foundation, a fresh viewpoint about people, money, and solutions.

Here are examples of how a stressed or unconscious mindset could influence your decisions.

1. You think that helping everybody would be great for business. The solution would be to define your audience by temperament, income level, and initial problems you could solve. By defining a narrow path for your ideal client, you earn more and have more.

2. You set a sliding scale in good-hearted effort to turn away no one that you could help. While deserving and lovely, these clients are less than your ideal when it comes to their ability to pay. Can you meet your budget with a lower-end scale? Yes, possibly with a group program or class. Then, would this client enter into private coaching? Did they value your work and you?

Before you can realize your dreams of four-or-five-figure clients, you have internal work to upgrade. Perhaps these changes in the coaching mindset help you be open minded, focused, compassionate, playful or personal?

If you are a caring, heart-oriented supporter, your coaching strengths are:

  • Being able to re-frame other's doubts,
    Listening to one's story,
    Modeling the best conversation for the positive parenting with your client's kids.

If you are a charismatic influencer, you inspire those who admire you because

  • Your nature is gregarious
    You enjoy people, and they appreciate your friendliness
    You are an excellent example of creativity in action and brainstorming.

If you are an achiever-type coach, your coaching could challenge others

  • To tackle the project they've ignored
    To commit to the exercise routine they need
    To manage finances better
    To plan the product launch sooner than later

If you are the kind of coach who strategizes, your primary strength is solving people's problems This makes you an excellent consultant. In coaching, you can ask the right questions to help a client strategize:

  • What is the result you want?
    What is the first step you would take to get there?
    Can you outline the process?
    What resources will you need?

In coaching, you are often the cheerleader for your clients, and gratitude will be a quality that you want your clients to have.

In coaching, you expend energy being with your client. If you find yourself complaining or fatigued, what will you do to better care for you?

Growing Your Coaching Mindset Confidence

Here's something else top-end coaches have in common: confidence. They believe in what they do. They believe in their ability to help others achieve the same thing. They walk on stage or join a webinar filled with the knowledge that what they are about to say will change the lives of those who are listening. That is confidence!!

When you feel confident, you radiate confidence.
Just like how the person you're talking to on the phone can hear a smile in your voice, your potential clients can sense your mindset. If your mindset is not up to par with those you admire and mimic, you'll struggle to make the sale. Work on your attitude and confidence levels, and watch your income soar.

Formulate Your Coaching Procedures

Do you have a plan for coaching procedures for your business? The most efficient ways to deliver new business strategies and increase your coaching income are the goals for this blog course.

  • Do you have a stand-alone coach training program?
  • Do you have a group coaching program you offer weekly or monthly?

If you already have these types of programs, then your clients might be ready for the in-depth one-to-one coaching program. The package is a "top of the funnel" offer when establishing coaching procedures. 

Your clients would have read your free blog articles, perhaps participated in a group program, or enjoyed an online course. They know you and recognize your work. They know your value, and they'll be more than willing to pay for continued access to you. Moreover, your business experiences make you the perfect person to work with other emerging, talented business women. Your next step is to formalize the coaching package and make it available for sale.

The real value of private coaching is the influence you have and the impact you make on the lives of those you coach.
With group coaching or self-study programs, it's difficult to know how many people are putting your expertise to work for them.

In a private coaching program, you'll be connecting with clients one-on-one, and you'll see what's providing the most useful results.
Private coaching offers a highly rewarding relationship for both you and your customers.

STEP ONE -->

"Get Clear on the Problem You Solve"

As with every aspect of your business, your private coaching package must be highly targeted to be successful. You cannot just hang out your virtual shingle, call yourself a coach, and expect clients to line up for an appointment. Rather, to position yourself as the expert you are, become crystal clear on exactly:

• WHAT you do
• WHO you do it for
• HOW you want to do it
• WHICH emotional results and tangible changes can you offer and guarantee.

When you can articulate the exact problems, you solve and who you work with, it will be much easier to find your tribe and attract buyers for your program. For example, business coaches might focus on solving:

• Money mindset issues for women entrepreneurs
• Brand development for health and wellness coaches
• Marketing help for information product sellers
• Outsourcing problems for online businesses
• Life coaches solve different issues.
• Dating coaches have their particular area of expertise. Executive coaches focus on C-level employees.

You have your sweet spot, too, and it’s probably easy to identify.

Specialized Niche: You already know your general area of expertise, whether it's business, life, health, finance, parenting or personal growth.

Target Client Persona: Now think about who your favorite clients are. And if you don’t yet have clients, think about those you’ve helped in the past in any way—even if it’s through email or on social media.

• With whom did you most enjoy working?
• What problems were you happiest to solve?
• Which issues (and people) left you feeling frustrated and stressed out?
• Those questions belong in your coaching package.
• Who are your tribe members?These are the people for whom you're building your 1:1 package.

Next, consider what this client's biggest issue is. It's your ideal client's most pressing problem, the one she most needs to solve, and the one she will gladly pay to fix. Maybe her blog doesn’t get enough traffic. Perhaps her online dating profiles aren’t attracting her dream man. Or maybe her finances are out of control. Whatever the problem is, you have the answer and can help her find her answer. When you can craft a coaching package that gets results for your ideal client, you'll have a winning program. People will line up to enroll.

EXERCISE: DESCRIBE YOUR IDEAL CLIENT

If you haven't already done this exercise, spend some time defining your ideal customer. This exercise finalizes the coaching procedures you will put in place for automation. Explain everything you know about her, including her experience level, her dreams, her family life, her frustrations, her income, and anything else that will set her apart from millions of other potential clients. (Use additional sheets if needed.)

EXERCISE: STATE HER BIGGEST PROBLEM

Now that you've identified who your client is, the next steps are:

• Define her big issue concisely as possible, like
• Struggles with self-esteem
• Lacks confidence
• Struggles to lose weight
• Desires to explore relations