Tool–Defining Your Ideal Client 1

Why would a parent coach or a family coach take particular care in defining the type of person who would be their best customer or client?

Influencing Factors

1: Relationship research suggests that if we are relatively healthy in mindset and emotionality, we attract people, who are similar to us in Emotional patterns, Cultural preferences, Levels of empathy

2. Also, core temperaments influence whom we meet with and coach. Are you the personality type that can be authentic with all four temperaments? Can you work with the types of person who

  • Make excuses
  • Cancel appointments
  • Want to talk about it, and not do much about it
  • Becomes angry at you rather than the issue

3. Likewise, our values influence the decisions we make about our business and ideal clients.
This values of your ideal client affects everything you do from setting fees to determining your coaching programs, which will offer solutions to their problems and value to living an inspired life.

4. Spend your time on the most valuable task to make your business successful by defining your ideal client.

  • Age group
  • Income
  • Family status
  • Education
  • Lifestyle goals
  • Location

To make this list real, a clever trick of successful authors is to write a story. Authors write about their ideal reader, and you write about the client who is most compatible with you. You give her a name, a couple of kids, a husband who just doesn't get it, and a load of student loans. You know quite a bit about her, you think.
If you stop there, you may be missing a huge piece of the puzzle—and losing out on the best clients because of temperament incompatibility.

Temperament Style Mismatch

The topic is rarely considered in the "ideal client" equation, and it's arguably the most important part: core temperament style.

If you're bossy, sarcastic, fun-loving and loud, then a quiet, middle-aged mom who spends her time volunteering at the church is probably not a good fit for you. WHY?

  • Natural exuberance may overwhelm the person.
  • If a client needs to start with small steps, and you whiz to the finish line, you've left the client in the dust.
  • Either he will be uncomfortable with your style, or you'll be miserable trying to reign in your natural exuberance.

Drive Determines Success

Check in with your client about their drive to success.

Adaptive Supporter type clients are slower to take the initiative, although they always meet their goal.  An achiever may be internally motivated but could move too fast and fail to plan adequately for meeting his goals. Both clients can be frustrating to coach unless you understand the core temperaments and what motivates each person to succeed.

Review your current and past coaching clients, and you'll identify the disposition patterns of those you attract. Review:
What characteristics did your most enjoyable client bring to the table?
What time frame do you expect a customer to meet their goals?
Which client behavioral patterns are those you do not want to deal with?
How do you handle your disappointment?
How do you celebrate your client's successes?

Compare your new potential clients to this ideal profile, and you'll never again sign on with a less-than-perfect client.