Ten Tips for Social Media Marketing

Do you design or plan your social media marketing campaigns to help gain more social following? The following tips help guide and increase brand visibility and drive traffic to your website, especially when rolling out your next social media campaign.

 

1. Reserve the same username across platforms

Reserve all your usernames across all the social media marketing platforms even if you don’t use them right away. As your business and online activity grows, you will need those usernames.

2. Decide which social media platforms suit your needs.

Not all social media platforms are suitable for your kind of marketing campaign. Building a presence and staying active on all available social media marketing platforms can be time-consuming. Identify platforms that bring the best results and focus on them. Initial research indicates that Facebook has the best advertising venues, but your ultimate question to answer is where does your audience hang out?

3. Optimize your social media platforms

Once you’ve decided on the platform you intend to use, focus on optimizing your profiles to get more followers. Consider using a real profile picture. Write a clear and comprehensive About page for each profile and include a link to your website.

4. Connect your social media marketing accounts to your site

Having all your active accounts connected to your websites helps to keep the conversation going. Visitors to your website can link to any of the listed accounts, and your followers on social media can find out more about your offer.

5. Find and follow leaders in your niche.

Find the most influential people in your niche and follow them to find inspiration. The chances are high that they share useful information about your niche or share their progress about a specific project.  Look over their shoulders for inspiration.

6. Don’t forget the hashtags

Yes, it’s not just a pretty function to make your phrase turn into a link and look cool. Most people use hashtags to search for topics on social media. The practice puts your article, product, ebook, or training in front of your audiences.

7. Stay social

Whether you are running a personal profile or company/brand’s social media account, you need to actually stay social and interactive. Follow other users, send friend requests, comment on people’s posts, and update your status regularly.

8. Stay out of trouble

Each social media platform has its own sets of rules, and some regulations cut across all the networks. For instance, Twitter has a limit on how many people you can follow per day. Facebook has a restriction on friend-requesting people you don’t know and so on.

9. Track mentions

By tracking when and how you or your website are mentioned every day, across platforms, is how you regulate your public relations. Use available tools to track every mention of your brand across all platforms. Discover what people are saying about you or your brand. Don’t miss a chance to neutralize any negative talk and re-post the positive aspects.

10. Post as many times per day but again, don’t overdo it.

The number of times to post per day for social media marketing will depend on the media network, the numbers of your followers, and how interactive your audience is.

Formulate Your Coaching Procedures

Do you have a plan for coaching procedures for your business? The most efficient ways to deliver new business strategies and increase your coaching income are the goals for this blog course.

  • Do you have a stand-alone coach training program?
  • Do you have a group coaching program you offer weekly or monthly?

If you already have these types of programs, then your clients might be ready for the in-depth one-to-one coaching program. The package is a "top of the funnel" offer when establishing coaching procedures. 

Your clients would have read your free blog articles, perhaps participated in a group program, or enjoyed an online course. They know you and recognize your work. They know your value, and they'll be more than willing to pay for continued access to you. Moreover, your business experiences make you the perfect person to work with other emerging, talented business women. Your next step is to formalize the coaching package and make it available for sale.

The real value of private coaching is the influence you have and the impact you make on the lives of those you coach.
With group coaching or self-study programs, it's difficult to know how many people are putting your expertise to work for them.

In a private coaching program, you'll be connecting with clients one-on-one, and you'll see what's providing the most useful results.
Private coaching offers a highly rewarding relationship for both you and your customers.

STEP ONE -->

"Get Clear on the Problem You Solve"

As with every aspect of your business, your private coaching package must be highly targeted to be successful. You cannot just hang out your virtual shingle, call yourself a coach, and expect clients to line up for an appointment. Rather, to position yourself as the expert you are, become crystal clear on exactly:

• WHAT you do
• WHO you do it for
• HOW you want to do it
• WHICH emotional results and tangible changes can you offer and guarantee.

When you can articulate the exact problems, you solve and who you work with, it will be much easier to find your tribe and attract buyers for your program. For example, business coaches might focus on solving:

• Money mindset issues for women entrepreneurs
• Brand development for health and wellness coaches
• Marketing help for information product sellers
• Outsourcing problems for online businesses
• Life coaches solve different issues.
• Dating coaches have their particular area of expertise. Executive coaches focus on C-level employees.

You have your sweet spot, too, and it’s probably easy to identify.

Specialized Niche: You already know your general area of expertise, whether it's business, life, health, finance, parenting or personal growth.

Target Client Persona: Now think about who your favorite clients are. And if you don’t yet have clients, think about those you’ve helped in the past in any way—even if it’s through email or on social media.

• With whom did you most enjoy working?
• What problems were you happiest to solve?
• Which issues (and people) left you feeling frustrated and stressed out?
• Those questions belong in your coaching package.
• Who are your tribe members?These are the people for whom you're building your 1:1 package.

Next, consider what this client's biggest issue is. It's your ideal client's most pressing problem, the one she most needs to solve, and the one she will gladly pay to fix. Maybe her blog doesn’t get enough traffic. Perhaps her online dating profiles aren’t attracting her dream man. Or maybe her finances are out of control. Whatever the problem is, you have the answer and can help her find her answer. When you can craft a coaching package that gets results for your ideal client, you'll have a winning program. People will line up to enroll.

EXERCISE: DESCRIBE YOUR IDEAL CLIENT

If you haven't already done this exercise, spend some time defining your ideal customer. This exercise finalizes the coaching procedures you will put in place for automation. Explain everything you know about her, including her experience level, her dreams, her family life, her frustrations, her income, and anything else that will set her apart from millions of other potential clients. (Use additional sheets if needed.)

EXERCISE: STATE HER BIGGEST PROBLEM

Now that you've identified who your client is, the next steps are:

• Define her big issue concisely as possible, like
• Struggles with self-esteem
• Lacks confidence
• Struggles to lose weight
• Desires to explore relations

 

Checklist to Build Your Entrepreneurial Business Model

You need a plan in order to make your business idea a reality. Your coaching business blueprint will guide your business from the beginning to ensure your success. 

First Steps of Business Model

Name your business – using your real name or a name that identifies your services.
Choose a name that can grow with you and define your focus accordingly as to local, international, or international attention. 

How expansive do you envision this?
Can your business name withstand international scrutiny?
Finding a corresponding URL name, even a misspelled one, is a necessary presence today.
Also, buy your name as a domain name.

Tiers of Business Formats

Hang out your shingle and take personal checks as a solo entrepreneur

Legally set up a sole proprietorship as doing business in your state in your business name, The advantages of this business model are the setup 
•Is more professional
•Allows payments are made to business name
•Could be eligible for PayPal business account.
•The accounting separates the personal expenses from the business expenses.

Incorporation Levels

  1. Limited Liability Corporation (LLC) – the benefit is that you receive the liability protection of a corporation, but the tax benefits of a sole proprietorship. Cost could be between $500 to $1000 for setup and paperwork fees.
  2. Limited Liability Partnership (LLP) – Two or more coaches working together. Each partner is responsible for mistakes, and tax liability doesn’t cross over to partner.
  3. If unsure, start as a sole proprietorship and carefully investigate the pros and cons.
 

Summary of A Good Fit of Parent’s and Child’s Temperaments

 When coaches or consultants are working with parents or a family, take time with parents to establish a good fit between the parent's temperament and the child's temperament. 

What Is Creating a Good Fit?

The term "goodness of fit, or used here as the good fit, refers to parents meeting the needs of a child by parenting according to the temperament of each child. The goodness of fit between a child's temperament and your parenting temperament style is essential for healthy social and emotional development for both you and your child. Also, you want to meet your personal needs as a parent in daily living from sleeping well at night to scheduling date nights.

How To Create A Good Fit?

The Nine Traits Inventory is helpful in determining reaction patterns in children and typically is used from infancy through the first to fifth grade. For example, two-year-old Lucy was very shy. Each month when Mom's book group came for an evening, Lucy's mom thought she was helping by pushing Lucy forward or holding Lucy while mom's friends hugged her hello. Lucy, however, appeared frightened and pulled back.

Being with and observing your child, you start to note how he or she responds to people, environments, stress, food, etc. You'll be observant of how you react. Are you reactive? Or are you proactive? 

Your goal is to become an active parent by recognizing feelings and watching behaviors. The more you observe your child's traits, the more prepared you're a master at managing and supporting temperaments. You are watching your child adapt, and then you adjust to varied environments and situations as you go along. Lucy's mom took the hint when a book club member mentioned that because Lucy seemed overly shy, why not let her hang out at the book club meeting for several weeks without pushing her into anyone or anything. Instead, the friend suggested that Lucy explores and find her level of comfort in her way. These moms would watch how she did it and learned what comforted Lucy. That advice was excellent for Lucy's mom to allow temperament expressions to evolve into a good fit for the situation. 

What Does Adapting the Environment Mean?

Here are examples of how different parents handled changing the environment to meet the needs of a child.

Marilynn got upset when something new was happening the next day or an activity would be different. Her mom started talking about the exciting new event one week before it would happen. She'd mention in normal conversation each night, and the night before the event was the most critical. Marilynn asked, "Is it tomorrow?" Mom responded wth yes, which made Marilynn cry more. Marilynn would speak of being scared and not liking new things she didn't know about. Mom adapted the environment by talking about the event with her daughter. She left an additional hour for Marilynn to get ready for bed, cry, read a book, and talk some more before turning off the light. On the following mornings, Marilynn did all right and held herself together. Somehow, her living through the fear before the event seemed to make her happier to be there.

Do you see how common sense the adaptations can be?

What questions do you have about a good fit between parents and children?

 

Free Course–Step Seven–Setting Boundaries

Even with a clear communication plan and format in place, your client may push the limits. Setting boundaries is a primary task for your peach of mind and your client's best coaching experience.  

  • Clients may keep you on the phone longer than you intended
  • They will email you more than is allowed
  • They might text you for non-emergencies
  • They will send you messages on Facebook, on Twitter, on Voxer, or anywhere else that is convenient for them—regardless of your preferences

Does This Work Both Ways?

Are you tempted to reach out on the weekend to answer a question or schedule a call on a Sunday afternoon because that's when your client is available. You might think this is good business—after all, you're building a relationships.

The idea is not the best for you. The situation will lead to burn out because your boundaries are weak.  You'll always feel like you must do more for your clients. Sooner or later, you'll lose touch with your own health and personal space.

Setting boundaries is the answer for both you and your customers. Establish from the outset exactly what your coaching package includes, and be sure to include when contact takes place.

 For example, you might say:

Your coaching package includes one monthly, 50-minute phone call with me and one question by email each working day.

 My workdays are Monday through Thursday from 10 am to 4 pm Eastern, and I'll answer all calls and emails during that time.

With this format, you are setting boundaries and have included 

  • What the client gets (one phone call and once daily emails)
  • When she gets it (Monday through Thursday from 10 am to 4 pm)

You’ll also need to establish exactly how your clients should contact you, and what will happen if they do not follow the procedures. Setting boundaries includes  specific email addresses and phone numbers or conference lines exclusively for your client use.

Another step is to create “planned responses” to send out when a client attempts to contact you outside of your established boundaries.. For example, if you receive a Facebook message (and you don’t offer this as a form of contact) you might respond with:

Thank you for reaching out, and I'm happy to help you with this big issue. For better organization of my client files, though, I do ask that you send all your questions to my email address at yourname@yourdomain.com.

A gentle reminder for setting boundaries creates a better coaching relationship for both of you.

To keep phone calls shorter, use a simple kitchen timer. At the start of the call, tell your client, "We have XX minutes today, so I'm going to set a timer for YY minutes to remind us when it's almost time to end. That will help ensure I can answer all your questions."

Then set your timer for 5 minutes before the call is to end. When the timer goes off, let your client know you have 5 minutes remaining, and ask if she has any final questions before you hang up. Following this simple system will prevent those endless phone calls that trample all forms of boundaries. 

Resist the temptation to allow calls to be booked outside of your working hours, or to respond to questions on the weekend, or to book additional appointments "just this once." 

Doing so will make it appear to your client that your boundaries are flexible, and will invite them to push the limits as well. After all, if you email on the weekend, it must be ok, right?

 

Exercise: Map Your Work Hours

 

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat

6am

 

Exercise: Craft Your Boundary Responses

How will you set the expectation at the start of a call, so it does not run too long?

How will you respond if a client contacts you outside your established system?

What will you tell yourself when you fail to respect your own boundaries?