Coaching Whole-Parent and Whole Child

When coaching whole parent, child or family member, the best coaching model is the wholistic viewpoint: involving the physical, mental, emotional, intuitive, spiritual, and social intelligences affecting each person.

It can be of no benefit to simply examine one or two of these intelligences.  This would not give you a holistically complete and thorough view of the child and parent. Coaching whole parents and whole children is more beneficial when you look beyond the surface level of behavior and symptoms. What is truly influencing or causing the reaction or behavior?

  • Temperaments?
  • Emotional frustration?
  • Lack of Understanding?
  • Need or more information?
  • Need for more experience? 

For example, if a child gets an ear ache or undefined tummy ache, do you check in with the doctor? Are medications enough? Not likely. It would be in everyone’s best interest to look at what is going on with that child from a whole perspective. Determine what is going emotionally, mentally and/or socially. A child may also be having trouble with a peer at daycare or in school or maybe even with the teacher. Emotional and social problems can show up as physical symptoms.

ACPI Coach and parent Kristy Dixon explains why:

“In coaching whole parent and whole-child, the parent is guided to self-discovery of their internal and external influences. They envision  their parenting goal and feeling baby steps of success along the way. When looking at the whole child, the parent is better able to help rather than punish that child. For example ,if a child is having a fit. the parents  would allow that child time to release their anger, frustration, disappointment, whatever it may be that needs to be released rather than labeling that child as ADHD, Oppositional Defiant, challenging, or out of control. If looking at the whole child one may find that the true culprit of this fit may be the result of the child “using up all of his good” (self-control and restraint) at school, or again of too much sugar in the diet or reaction to a food allergy, or of not feeling heard by his or her parents. Children struggle to learn how to express their feelings and needs appropriately. It is our job to investigate the mystery of what is causing this type of behavior. Then help the child express  in a more effective and safer way. However, we cannot do that if we do not thoroughly look at all influencing factors in the child’s life.”

See also Coaching Whole-Parent and Whole Child 2

 

Tool-Ideal Coaching Clients 3 Checklist

The easiest way a parent coach knows coaching clients is to understand their current problems and needs.

One of the conditions for someone to hire you as their parent coach or family coach is that they believe you can help them with their problem, be a better person, help them change their parenting behaviors, etc.

If you know how the ideal client defines her problem, you can show that expertise in your writing, web site, and  through talks, and blog articles. It is important for her to know you can help her. It is more important to show her how you do that, and this checklist clarifies information.

Generalized Information

Living situation (where, what type of place, with whom) Occupation Work situation (position, income, general job description)

Who is she close to?

What is her relationship with her family?

Where does her family live?

What is her core temperament type?

What size is her body (wt, ht)?

Hair color and style?

Eye color?

Habits

Does she exercise? How and how often?

What does she do for fun, hobbies? What does she do on weekends? Does she eat out or eat in more?

If she eats out quite a bit, at what types of places?

What is her name?

Thoughts or Questions

What keeps her up worrying at night? (This is a key question for you to ask yourself about your ideal client.)

Most importantly: what precipitated her calling for an appointment now?

How would she describe her problem?

How would she answer the question: What would you like from parent coaching

1. Storytelling for Business

Stories work in marketing, and especially in coaching. Each parent you coach has their personal story and their parent story. You will find the different story themes in commercials and in the way brands present themselves. Storytelling is especially helpful in parent coaching and family coaching. Each person has their story, their version of how they happened.

Sharing and telling stories work well for online marketers.

The hardest part of telling a story is figuring out what to say. It’s not easy to come up with a good storyline when you’re staring at a blank screen. The solution is to stick with one of the tried and true basic story plots and tweak from there. Here are three of the most popular ones.

1. Good Vs. Evil

1. Let’s start with the big good vs. evil theme. Most fairy tales use this storyline as do fiction books like Harry Potter series. You’ll also see in television programs that the story line follows a pattern.

You accept a challenge
You face adversity In coaching, the adversary may be a quality in a client to name and tame, or perhaps you have had a personal problem with procrastination that you want to reprogram for better business success.

2. A second pattern is a transformation. Similar to the previous, this plot features an inner change, instead of changing the outer form. You may find this theme often in your clients. You may have your personal transformation story.

Here is an example of my conversion story:

I had waited too long to seek treatment for a growing, painful condition with my right ovary. I thought I could handle it, but I had no clear understanding of the problem. My new, young, inexperienced gynecologist explained to me that the ovary had turned in on itself and was necrotic, in short, dead. She scheduled my surgery immediately with her professor, also a surgeon.

After surgery, I died in the clinical sense. I had closed my eyes and instantly opened my eyes in brilliant white light in which I floated. I was delighted to be there, experiencing the transition with consciousness. The experience made evident that I was to “take on a new task,” explained the voice. The result was my formulation of the Academy for Coaching Parents International which took about three years to get off the ground.

2. The Reluctant Hero Returns

This storyline should sound familiar too. The boy leaves home, builds his fortune while he’s away, or learns something important. Then the hero comes back to share the discovered wealth or knowledge. Along the way, he might just save the day. Does that sound like a Western or romantic comedy you’ve seen lately?

With this storyline, you can share your personal story of how you discovered your chosen niche. Maybe you’re the gluten-free expert because your child was diagnosed with Celiac Disease, and you and your family had to find a way to live with it.

3. Rags To Riches

This storyline also shouldn’t come as a surprise. You’ve seen it in a million forms from Cinderella to Shark Tank. The idea is to share how you went from nothing to where you’re at today. It’s the quintessential American story.

This storyline works well when you’re sharing how you’ve made your money online. If you’re marketing to marketers or business to business, this is the storyline you’ll use more than any other. The story line is not limited to the “making money'” market. Tweak the same storyline and share:
1. how you found more time in your day,
2. how you organize your office or your writing,
3. how you found your faith, your courage, or your self-esteem.

Any journey of growth could become a “rags to riches storyline.

What is your story? Which category for storytelling best suits you? Please answer in the comments below so I can learn what stories you would like to read.

Successful Parent-Coach Entrepreneur Mindset Traits (3-4-5)

Does the title Certified Parent Coach show up in your mind? Do you play the role of mentoring families in your head? Here is why you do, and it is good news.

People go into entrepreneurship for the freedom of managing their own time and resources. It is a good reason, but they need to plan their entrepreneurial journey.

3. Envisioning: To see in your mind the steps to business success are clues that depict two facts:

You can manifest the vision.
The steps will make themselves known to you. Your job is to watch for the positive (or negative) clues.

I see this quite often when professionals call ACPI about being a parenting coach. They think about it, and suddenly see the term online, and click through to the site. They have a dream about it. They’ve expressed interest in parent coaching and then meet a parent coach. You can call it synchronous, but I call it manifesting one’s intention.

Th result is a clear vision of the plan or objectives of the business.
Planning gives the entrepreneur the ability of foresight enabling allocation of resources for any outcomes.

4. Being Determined
After the creation of the action plan, entrepreneurs decide to commit and maintain a high level of determination to attain success. Believe it or not, the determining and planning keep you interested and motivated enough to commit for the long term.

 Sustaining is an extension of determination.
Business involves a commitment to the workload. Will you accept that the buck stops there with you? This challenge is enough to discourage an entrepreneur.

Before you embark on the journey, you must be fully determined to see the business through, and this will prop you up even when the pressure of the market mounts.
Learn from failures
Sustain determination
Envision and plan for strong profits.
You have to start over again if a failure should happen. Claim the tenacity of building a better business

5. Be Passionate

Passion is the fuel that drives commitment and determination necessary to succeed on the entrepreneurial journey. As an entrepreneur, you have to appreciate what you do, and it starts with knowing why you went into the business.

Passion based on your business’s particular mission is an intrinsic drive that carries you through the long days and the long nights that consume your energy for life. Without passion, you will quickly cave into the stress, and the pressure and your entrepreneurial journey will be a short lived one. Passion provides the entrepreneur with an internal reward that sustains them between paydays.

4. Envision Your Role As A Parent Coach

Five Years From Now?

It is important to have a vision of your future when you design your parent coach business plan and marketing strategy as a parent coach. Here is a checklist to spark innovative thoughts for your business.

  • How big do you want your business to grow?
  • How much time can you devote to it now, and five years from now?
  • What hours of the day do you want to work now, and once your business is going?
  • Are you going to take phone calls all hours of the day and night?
  • Are you going to take evening clients? In parent coaching, many clients will want evening or weekend appointments.  Can you accommodate them?
  • What hours do you want to relax with your family?

Take the time to write down a schedule of your ideal week, including time for relaxation and taking care of your health. Whether you are single or married, whether your children are in college or are toddlers, come up with a personalized design that allows you to meet your family obligations and your own needs to relax and grow as a person.

If your best moments come when you are in nature, plan your week so you have that time to spend in nature and to reconnect with yourself. Don’t let go of what most satisfies your own soul because of business obligations.

As a coach to families, people regard you as a role model. You have to model a healthy integration of work and family for your clients. If you don’t succeed, how can you expect help others succeed?

In the beginning being a parent coach you will focus primary energy into marketing and networking, which are usually unpaid tasks to build into your business plan.

Fill your heart and mind with optimism as you network and market your parent coaching practice. Your positive attitude and caring are what attract people to work with a parent coach. The image you reflect when you show up is much more important than any piece of sheepskin.

When small businesses fail, it is usually because of lack of planning and design. When you create your coaching business, be sure you have realistic expectations about how much time you can devote to it now and in the future. Develop a schedule for today and five years from now. If you work out of your house, build clear separations between your personal life and your business. Do this by only working certain hours, shutting the business down regularly for personal time, and by having a work place clearly separate from your living area.

Now if you are looking right ahead into the future, it’s now the time to take step toward that goal or desired future.  If you are not a parent coaching already, look into our certifications for parent coaching but if you are already a parent coach and you are looking for someone to show you all the steps to make your coaching business successful, signup for our course Successful Business Set-up in systemized steps to skyrocket your startup today.

Successful Business Set-up in systemized steps

certifications for parent coaching